MTA Rules of Conduct Photography in Subway

Rules governing the conduct and safety of the public in the use of the facilities of the New York City Transit Authority and Manhattan and Bronx Surface Transit Operating Authority.

Section 1050.9

Restricted areas and activities.

1. No person, except as specifically authorized by the Authority, shall enter or attempt to enter into any area not open to the public, including but not limited to train operator’s cabs, conductor’s cabs, bus operator’s seat location, station booths, closed-off areas, mechanical or equipment rooms, concession stands, storage areas, interior rooms, catwalks, emergency stairways (except in cases of an emergency), tracks, roadbeds, tunnels, plants, shops, barns, train yards, garages, depots or any area marked with a sign restricting access or indicating a dangerous environment.
2. No vehicle, except as specifically authorized, may be parked on Authority property.
3. Photography, filming or video recording in any facility or conveyance is permitted except that ancillary equipment such as lights, reflectors or tripods may not be used. Members of the press holding valid identification issued by the New York City Police Department are hereby authorized to use necessary ancillary equipment. All photographic activity must be conducted in accordance with the provisions of this Part.
4. No person may ride on the roof, platform between subway cars or on any other area outside any subway car or bus or other conveyance operated by the Authority. No person may use the end doors of a subway car to pass from one subway car to another except in an emergency or when directed to do so by an Authority conductor or a New York City police officer.
5. No person shall extend his or her hand, arm, leg, head or other part of his or her person, or extend any item, article or other substance outside of the window or door of a subway car, bus or other conveyance operated by the Authority.
6. No person shall enter or leave a subway car, bus or other conveyance operated by the Authority except through the entrances and exits provided for that purpose.
7. No person may carry on or bring to any facility or conveyance any item that:
1. is so long as to extend outside the window or door of a subway car, bus or other conveyance;
2. constitutes a hazard to the operation of the Authority, interferes with passenger traffic, or impedes service; or
3. constitutes a danger or hazard to other persons.

Nothing contained in this section shall apply to the use of wheelchairs, crutches, canes or other physical assistance devices.

No Photo Ban in Subways, Yet an Arrest
By JIM DWYER
Published: February 17, 2009

London Community Support Officers Bully A Videographer About Filming in Public Spaces

The act of filming or photographing subjects in a public space is a contentious issue these days, especially when confronted by a police officer who feels it is within his or her legal authority to control such behavior. The issue pits two rights against each other: the right of privacy versus freedom of the press. In a democracy, freedom of the press trumps the right of privacy when the subject is present in a PUBLIC SPACE.

The argument is simple: a person who ventures out of his or her home or some other private property has no reasonable expectation, once they have stepped foot into a public space, of maintaining their privacy. A person’s actions in public spaces are open to view and therefore the mechanical recording of those actions by a law-abiding citizen is perfectly allowable. In essence, your right to privacy ends the moment your actions are viewable from a public space.

Freedom of the press to record any actions in a public space protects the fundamental nature of a Democracy: you are being held accountable for your public behavior. The evidence of your behavior provides the basis upon which your actions can later be held accountable to the laws of society. If you deny freedom of the press, the social contract and laws that govern all human behavior becomes a folly of authoritarian agendas where the human spirit is subjugated to the will of a those who value power and control over personal expression.

Suppression of freedom of press destroys a citizen’s right to privacy. You can’t have one without sacrificing the other.

The above video nicely demonstrates what happens when those invested with authority choose to enforce laws with little or no understanding of the reciprocal rights of those they are confronting. The reply of “Because I told you to” is the hobgoblin that not only fails the public trust but infects the human spirit with a logic that trades freedom for conformity under the guise of expediency.

I, for one, will have none of it.

Gina DeWolfe Fashion Supermodel Wearing Korean Designer Soojin Kang Coat Skirt New York City

gina dewolfe supermodel christopher peterson photography soojin kang korean designer

Supermodel Gina DeWolfe is a fashion student in Boston. She ventured down to New York City to model Korean fashion designer Soojin Kang’s clothes in various locations around the city, including Washington Square Park.

Soojin Kang is a New York-based designer who was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. She performed her studies at Samsung Art Design Institute, Parsons Paris, and Parsons School of Design in New York City.

The inspiration for her collection is derived from themes of social, cultural, and ecological responsibility. In choosing her material she seeks to recycle, deconstruct, and otherwise manipulate objects that have been cast off by society into attractive, contemporary design. Design is love. Wear love!

Portfolio

Gina DeWolfe Fashion Supermodel Wearing Korean Designer Soojin Kang Coat Skirt New York City

gina dewolfe supermodel christopher peterson soojin kang

Supermodel Gina DeWolfe is a fashion student in Boston. She ventured down to New York City to model Korean fashion designer Soojin Kang’s clothes in various locations around the city, including Washington Square Park.

Soojin Kang is a New York-based designer who was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. She performed her studies at Samsung Art Design Institute, Parsons Paris, and Parsons School of Design in New York City.

The inspiration for her collection is derived from themes of social, cultural, and ecological responsibility. In choosing her material she seeks to recycle, deconstruct, and otherwise manipulate objects that have been cast off by society into attractive, contemporary design. Design is love. Wear love!

Portfolio